News

Safety blitz targets commercial vehicles

By Bradford Times Staff

Ministry of Transportation inspection Officer Winegardner takes the plates off a truck during a safety blitz in Bradford, October 26, 2017. The vehicle was pulled over for having no company name on the truck and a suspected insecure load; inspection also found a leaking fuel tank and brake problems. Miriam King/Bradford Times/Postmedia Network

Ministry of Transportation inspection Officer Winegardner takes the plates off a truck during a safety blitz in Bradford, October 26, 2017. The vehicle was pulled over for having no company name on the truck and a suspected insecure load; inspection also found a leaking fuel tank and brake problems. Miriam King/Bradford Times/Postmedia Network

Winter weather is just around the corner, bringing ice and snow-covered roads and challenging driving conditions.

Getting a jump on the season, South Simcoe Police partnered with the OPP, York Regional Police and Ministry of Transportation Inspection Officers to conduct a safety blitz on commercial vehicles travelling Bradford West Gwillimbury roads.

A total of 11 officers were involved, on October 26  – 5 escorting vehicles to an inspection site set up at the Bob Fallis Sports Complex, on 10 Sideroad, and 6 others carrying out the inspections, looking at everything from brakes and taillights, to proper paperwork.

The blitz started at 6:30 a.m.; by 10:30 a.m. Police had already pulled over 21 vehicles, and 5 trailers. Fully 40% of the vehicles inspected were pulled off the road, their plates removed, said South Simcoe Police Const. Jason Vandersar .

The biggest issues were insecure loads and brake problems. One modified pick-up truck was inspected, and found to have the original, unmodified brake lines – which meant that the emergency brakes were inoperative.

One vehicle was found to be 18,000 lbs overweight.

A float carrying a large tractor had all of the required signage indicating a wide road – but only had a provincial wide-load permit, and nothing that would allow the vehicle to travel on County or municipal roads.

One driver was found to be driving under suspension.

And one truck, initially pulled over because there was no company name displayed on the vehicle, and its load of construction pilons and signage appeared to be insecure, was found to also have a leaking fuel tank, and rusted-out brake lines.

The plates were removed. “All the items have to be repaired before he gets his plates back,” said Vandersar. “It's safety, safety, safety.”